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Financial Terms beginning with C

C Corporation
A corporation is a company or group of people authorized to act as a single entity and recognized as such in law. Early incorporated entities were established by charter. Most jurisdictions now allow the creation of new corporations through registration.
C Note
C Share
C Suite
C. Michael Armstrong
C Michael Armstrong is an American business executive and former AT&T chairman and CEO. He tried to reestablish AT&T as an end-to-end carrier but, due to the dot-com bust and various other issues, he was forced to break the group up in 2001. He resigned in 2002 and was succeeded by AT&T President David Dorman.
C. Steven McMillan
C. Steven McMillan is an American businessman. He served as Chief Executive Officer of the Sara Lee Corporation from 2000 to 2005.
C
CAC 40
The CAC 40 is a benchmark French stock market index. The index represents a capitalization-weighted measure of the 40 most significant values among the 100 highest market caps on the Euronext Paris. It is one of the main national indices of the pan-European stock exchange group Euronext alongside Brussels' BEL20, Lisbon's PSI-20 and Amsterdam's AEX.
CAD
CAGR Compound Annual Growth Rate
CAMELS Rating System
The CELS ratings or Camels rating is a supervisory rating system originally developed in the U.S. to classify a bank's overall condition. It's applied to every bank and credit union in the U.S. and is also implemented outside the U.S. by various banking supervisory regulators.
CAN SLIM
CAN SLIM refers to the seven-pronged mnemonic publicized by the American newspaper Investor's Business Daily, which claims to be a checklist of the characteristics performing stocks tend to share before their biggest gains. It was developed in the 1950s by Investor's Business Daily editor William O'Neil who has reportedly made several hundreds of millions of dollars by consistently using its approach.
CAPEX Capital Expenditure
CAPM Capital Asset Pricing Model
CDO Collateralized Debt Obligation
CEO Chief Executive Officer
CPI Consumer Price Index
Cabinet Crowd
Cable
Cafeteria Plan
A cafeteria plan is a type of employee benefit plan offered in the United States pursuant to Section 125 of the Internal Revenue Code. Its name comes from the earliest such plans that allowed employees to choose between different types of benefits, similar to the ability of a customer to choose among available items in a cafeteria. Qualified cafeteria plans are excluded from gross income. To qualify, a cafeteria plan must allow employees to choose from two or more benefits consisting of cash or qualified benefit plans. The Internal Revenue Code explicitly excludes deferred compensation plans from qualifying as a cafeteria plan subject to a gross income exemption. Section 125 also provides two exceptions.
Cage
Caisse Populaire
CalPERS
The California Public Employees' Retirement System is an agency in the California executive branch that "manages pension and health benefits for more than 1.6 million California public employees, retirees, and their families". In fiscal year 2012–13, CalPERS paid over $12.7 billion in retirement benefits, and in fiscal year 2013 it is estimated that CalPERS will pay over $7.5 billion in health benefits.
Calamity Call
Calculated Intangible Value (CIV)
Calculation Agent
Calcutta Stock Exchange (CAL) .CL
Calendar Effect
A calendar effect is any market anomaly or economic effect which appears to be related to the calendar. Such effects include the apparently different behaviour of stock markets on different days of the week, different times of the month, and different times of year. The term sometimes includes multi-year effects, such as the 10-year cycle, or the 4-year U.S. presidential election cycle. It also sometimes includes time of day effects.
Calendar Spread
In finance, a calendar spread is a spread trade involving the simultaneous purchase of futures or options expiring on a particular date and the sale of the same instrument expiring on another date. The legs of the spread vary only in expiration date; they are based on the same underlying market and strike price.
Calendar Year Accounting Incurred Losses
Calendar Year Experience
Calendar Year
Generally speaking, a calendar year begins on the New Year's Day of the given calendar system and ends on the day before the following New Year's Day, and thus consists of a whole number of days. A calendar year can also start on any other named day of the calendar, and end on the day before this named day in the following year. To reconcile the calendar year with the astronomical cycle certain years contain extra days.
Calgary Dollar
The Calgary Dollar is a local currency in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. While functioning as a limited form of currency within Calgary, it is not legal tender nor is it backed by a national government. Instead, the currency serves as a tool for community economic development as well as a focus for community building. The Calgary Dollars organization considers its local currency to be implicitly sanctioned by the Canada Revenue Agency based on a CRA publication which discusses the taxation of "credit units possessing a notional monetary unit value" used as a medium of exchange by local barter groups.
Call Auction
Call Date
A callable bond is a type of bond that allows the issuer of the bond to retain the privilege of redeeming the bond at some point before the bond reaches its date of maturity. In other words, on the call date, the issuer has the right, but not the obligation, to buy back the bonds from the bond holders at a defined call price. Technically speaking, the bonds are not really bought and held by the issuer but are instead cancelled immediately.
Call Deposit Account
Call Loan Rate
Call Loan
Call Market
Call Money Rate
Call Money
Call money is minimum 5% short-term finance repayable on demand, with a maturity period of one to fourteen days or overnight to fortnight. It is used for inter-bank transactions. The money that is lent for one day in this market is known as "call money" and, if it exceeds one day, is referred to as "notice money."
Call On A Call
Call Option
A call option, often simply labeled a "call", is a financial contract between two parties, the buyer and the seller of this type of option. The buyer of the call option has the right, but not the obligation, to buy an agreed quantity of a particular commodity or financial instrument from the seller of the option at a certain time for a certain price. The seller is obligated to sell the commodity or financial instrument to the buyer if the buyer so decides. The buyer pays a fee for this right. The term "call" comes from the fact that the owner has the right to "call the stock away" from the seller.
Call Over
Call Premium
Call Price
Call Privilege
Call Protection
Call Provision
Call Ratio Backspread
Call Report
All regulated financial institutions in the United States are required to file periodic financial and other information with their respective regulators and other parties. For banks in the U.S., one of the key reports required to be filed is the quarterly Consolidated Report of Condition and Income, generally referred to as the call report or RC report. Specifically, every National Bank, State Member Bank and insured Nonmember Bank is required by the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council to file a call report as of the close of business on the last day of each calendar quarter, i.e. the report date. The specific reporting requirements depend upon the size of the bank and whether or not it has any foreign offices. Call reports are due no later than 30 days after the end of each calendar quarter. Revisions may be made without prejudice up to 30 days after the initial filing period.
Call Risk
Call Rule
Call Swaption
Call Warrant
Call
Callable Bond
A callable bond is a type of bond that allows the issuer of the bond to retain the privilege of redeeming the bond at some point before the bond reaches its date of maturity. In other words, on the call date, the issuer has the right, but not the obligation, to buy back the bonds from the bond holders at a defined call price. Technically speaking, the bonds are not really bought and held by the issuer but are instead cancelled immediately.
Callable Certificate Of Deposit
Callable Common Stock
Callable Preferred Stock
Callable Security
Callable Swap
Called Away
Calmar Ratio
Calmar ratio is a performance measurement used to evaluate Commodity Trading Advisors and hedge funds. It was created by Terry W. Young and first published in 1991 in the trade journal Futures.
Cambist
Cambrist
Camouflage Compensation
Canada's New Stock Exchange (CNQ)
Canada Education Savings Grant (CESG)
Canada Learning Bond
The Canada Learning Bond is a grant paid by the government of Canada to assist low-income families with saving money for their children's post-secondary education. The CLB relies primarily on the National Child Benefit program to determine which families may be eligible and the tax regulations for the Registered Education Savings Plan to guide the eventual use of the CLB funds.
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)
Canada Pension Plan (CPP)
Canada Premium Bond (CPB)
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA)
Canada Savings Bond (CSB)
Canadian Association Of Petroleum Producers (CAPP)
Canadian Capital Markets Association (CCMA)
Canadian Competition Act
Canadian Council Of Insurance Regulators (CCIR)
Canadian Deposit Insurance Corporation (CDIC)
Canadian Depository For Securities Limited (CDS)
Canadian Derivatives Clearing Corporation (CDCC)
Canadian Income Trust
Canadian Institute Of Actuaries (CIA)
Canadian Institute Of Chartered Accountants (CICA)
Canadian Investor Protection Fund (CIPF)
Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)
Canadian Originated Preferred Securities (COPrS)
Canadian Overnight Money Market Rate
Canadian Rollover Mortgage
Canadian Royalty Trust (CANROY)
Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA)
Canadian Securities Course™ (CSC™)
Canadian Securities Institute (CSI)
Canary Call
Cancel Former Order (CFO)
Cancelable Insurance
Canceled Check
Canceled Order
Cancellation Of Debt (COD)
Cancellation Provision Clause
Cancellation
Capital Gain
A capital gain is a profit that results from a sale of a capital asset, such as stock, bond or real estate, where the sale price exceeds the purchase price. The gain is the difference between a higher selling price and a lower purchase price. Conversely, a capital loss arises if the proceeds from the sale of a capital asset are less than the purchase price.
Capital Gains Tax
A capital gains tax is a tax on capital gains, the profit realized on the sale of a non-inventory asset that was purchased at a cost amount that was lower than the amount realized on the sale. The most common capital gains are realized from the sale of stocks, bonds, precious metals and property. Not all countries implement a capital gains tax and most have different rates of taxation for individuals and corporations.
Capitalism
Cash Flow
Cashflow (Under Review)
Certificate of Deposit
A certificate of deposit is a time deposit, a financial product commonly sold in the United States and elsewhere by banks, thrift institutions, and credit unions.
Charitable Contributions
Charitable Remainder Trust
A charitable trust is an irrevocable trust established for charitable purposes, and is a more specific term than "charitable organization".
Committee On Payment And Settlement Systems
Committee Payment Settlement Systems CPSS (Under Review)
Commodity
In economics, a commodity is a substantially fungible marketable item produced to satisfy wants or needs. Economic commodities comprise goods and services. The word commodity came into use in English in the 15th century, from the French commodité, "amenity, convenience". Going further back, the French word derives from the Latin commoditas, meaning "suitability, convenience, advantage". The Latin word commodus meant variously "appropriate", "proper measure, time, or condition", and "advantage, benefit".
Common Stock
Common stock is a form of corporate equity ownership, a type of security. The terms "voting share" or "ordinary share" are also used frequently in other parts of the world; "common stock" being primarily used in the United States.
Compound Interest
The addition of interest to the principal sum of a loan or deposit is called compounding. Compound interest is interest on interest. It is the result of reinvesting interest, rather than paying it out, so that interest in the next period is then earned on the principal sum plus previously-accumulated interest. Compound interest is standard in finance and economics.
Contango
Contango is a situation where the futures price]] of a commodity is higher than the expected spot price. In a contango situation, hedgers or arbitrageurs/speculators, are "willing to pay more [now] for a commodity at some point in the future than the actual expected price of the commodity [at that future point]. This may be due to people's desire to pay a premium to have the commodity in the future rather than paying the costs of storage and carry costs of buying the commodity today."
Corporations
Correction
Correlation
Cost Basis
Basis, as used in United States tax law, is the original cost of property, adjusted for factors such as depreciation. When property is sold, the taxpayer pays/ taxes on a capital gain/ that equals the amount realized on the sale minus the sold property's basis.
Creative Destruction (Under Review)
Creative destruction
Creative destruction, sometimes known as Schumpeter's gale, is a concept in economics which since the 1950s has become most readily identified with the Austrian American economist Joseph Schumpeter who derived it from the work of Karl Marx and popularized it as a theory of economic innovation and the business cycle.
Credit Card (Under Review)
Credit Cards
A credit card is a payment card issued to users as a method of payment. It allows the cardholder to pay for goods and services based on the holder's promise to pay for them. The issuer of the card creates a revolving account and grants a line of credit to the cardholder, from which the cardholder can borrow money for payment to a merchant or as a cash advance.
Credit Default Swap
A credit default swap is a financial swap agreement that the seller of the CDS will compensate the buyer in the event of a loan default or other credit event. This is to say that the seller of the CDS insures the buyer against some reference loan defaulting.
Credit
Crony Capitalism
Crony capitalism is a term describing an economy in which success in business depends on close relationships between business people and government officials. It may be exhibited by favoritism in the distribution of legal permits, government grants, special tax breaks, or other forms of state interventionism.
Cup and Handle
In the domain of technical analysis of market prices, a cup and handle or cup with handle formation is a chart pattern consisting of a drop in the price and a rise back up to the original value, followed a smaller drop and a rise past the previous peak. It is interpreted as an indication of bullish sentiment in the market and possible further price increases.
Currency Carry Trade
Currency