Terms

  1. CAGR Compound Annual Growth Rate
  2. CAPEX Capital Expenditure
  3. CAPM Capital Asset Pricing Model
  4. CDO Collateralized Debt Obligation
  5. CEO Chief Executive Officer
  6. CPI Consumer Price Index
  7. Capital Gain
    A capital gain is a profit that results from a sale of a capital asset, such as stock, bond or real estate, where the sale price exceeds the purchase price. The gain is the difference between a higher selling price and a lower purchase price. Conversely, a capital loss arises if the proceeds from the sale of a capital asset are less than the purchase price.
  8. Capital Gains Tax
    A capital gains tax is a tax on capital gains, the profit realized on the sale of a non-inventory asset that was purchased at a cost amount that was lower than the amount realized on the sale. The most common capital gains are realized from the sale of stocks, bonds, precious metals and property. Not all countries implement a capital gains tax and most have different rates of taxation for individuals and corporations.
  9. Capitalism
  10. Cash Flow
  11. Cashflow (Under Review)
  12. Certificate of Deposit
    A certificate of deposit is a time deposit, a financial product commonly sold in the United States and elsewhere by banks, thrift institutions, and credit unions.
  13. Charitable Contributions
  14. Charitable Remainder Trust
    A charitable trust is an irrevocable trust established for charitable purposes, and is a more specific term than "charitable organization".
  15. Committee On Payment And Settlement Systems
  16. Committee Payment Settlement Systems CPSS (Under Review)
  17. Commodity
    In economics, a commodity is a substantially fungible marketable item produced to satisfy wants or needs. Economic commodities comprise goods and services. The word commodity came into use in English in the 15th century, from the French commodité, "amenity, convenience". Going further back, the French word derives from the Latin commoditas, meaning "suitability, convenience, advantage". The Latin word commodus meant variously "appropriate", "proper measure, time, or condition", and "advantage, benefit".
  18. Common Stock
    Common stock is a form of corporate equity ownership, a type of security. The terms "voting share" or "ordinary share" are also used frequently in other parts of the world; "common stock" being primarily used in the United States.
  19. Compound Interest
    The addition of interest to the principal sum of a loan or deposit is called compounding. Compound interest is interest on interest. It is the result of reinvesting interest, rather than paying it out, so that interest in the next period is then earned on the principal sum plus previously-accumulated interest. Compound interest is standard in finance and economics.
  20. Contango
    Contango is a situation where the futures price]] of a commodity is higher than the expected spot price. In a contango situation, hedgers or arbitrageurs/speculators, are "willing to pay more [now] for a commodity at some point in the future than the actual expected price of the commodity [at that future point]. This may be due to people's desire to pay a premium to have the commodity in the future rather than paying the costs of storage and carry costs of buying the commodity today."
  21. Corporations
  22. Correction
  23. Correlation
  24. Cost Basis
    Basis, as used in United States tax law, is the original cost of property, adjusted for factors such as depreciation. When property is sold, the taxpayer pays/ taxes on a capital gain/ that equals the amount realized on the sale minus the sold property's basis.
  25. Creative Destruction (Under Review)
  26. Creative destruction
    Creative destruction, sometimes known as Schumpeter's gale, is a concept in economics which since the 1950s has become most readily identified with the Austrian American economist Joseph Schumpeter who derived it from the work of Karl Marx and popularized it as a theory of economic innovation and the business cycle.
  27. Credit Card (Under Review)
  28. Credit Cards
    A credit card is a payment card issued to users as a method of payment. It allows the cardholder to pay for goods and services based on the holder's promise to pay for them. The issuer of the card creates a revolving account and grants a line of credit to the cardholder, from which the cardholder can borrow money for payment to a merchant or as a cash advance.
  29. Credit Default Swap
    A credit default swap is a financial swap agreement that the seller of the CDS will compensate the buyer in the event of a loan default or other credit event. This is to say that the seller of the CDS insures the buyer against some reference loan defaulting.
  30. Credit
  31. Crony Capitalism
    Crony capitalism is a term describing an economy in which success in business depends on close relationships between business people and government officials. It may be exhibited by favoritism in the distribution of legal permits, government grants, special tax breaks, or other forms of state interventionism.
  32. Cup and Handle
    In the domain of technical analysis of market prices, a cup and handle or cup with handle formation is a chart pattern consisting of a drop in the price and a rise back up to the original value, followed a smaller drop and a rise past the previous peak. It is interpreted as an indication of bullish sentiment in the market and possible further price increases.
  33. Currency Carry Trade
  34. Currency
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