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Financial Terms beginning with F

F. Duane Ackerman
F. Duane Ackerman is an American businessman. He was the last chairman and Chief Executive Officer of BellSouth Corporation.
F
FAAMG Stocks
FAANG Stocks
FASB 157
FDIC Insured Account
FDIC Problem Bank List
In American finance, the FDIC problem bank list is a confidential list created and maintained by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation which lists banks that are in jeopardy of failing. The list is closely monitored, and if problems continue with a listed bank, the FDIC takes control of the bank; it may then sell the problem bank to a stronger one, or liquidate the bank and pay off the depositors.
FED Pass
FICO Score
Fabless Company
Face Amount Certificate Company
Face Value
Facebook Credits
Facebook Credits was a virtual currency that enabled people to purchase items in games and non-gaming applications on the Facebook Platform. One U.S. dollar was the equivalent of 10 Facebook Credits. Facebook Credits were available in 15 currencies including U.S. dollars, pound sterling, euros, and Danish kroner. It was expected that Facebook would eventually expand Credits into a micropayment system open to any Facebook application, whether a game or a media company application. While the Facebook Credits website is still active, Facebook has announced that it is doing away with Facebook Credits in favor of local currency.
Facilitating Payment
A facilitating payment is a certain type of payment to foreign officials that is not considered to be bribery according to legislations of some states as well as in the international anti-bribery conventions, e.g., coming from the OECD.
Facility Operations
Facility management is a professional management discipline focused upon the efficient and effective delivery of support services for the organisations that it serves. It serves to ensure the integration of people, systems, place, process, and technology.
Facility
FactSet
FactSet Research Systems Inc., trading as FactSet, is a multinational financial data and software company headquartered in Norwalk, CT, United States. The company provides financial information and analytic software for investment professionals. For fiscal year 2015, FactSet's annual sales were $1.006 billion.
Factor
Factors Of Production
In economics, factors of production, resources, or inputs are what is used in the production process to produce output—that is, finished goods and services. The utilized amounts of the various inputs determine the quantity of output according to the relationship is called the production function. There are three basic resources or factors of production: land, labor and capital. The factors are also frequently labeled "producer goods or services" to distinguish them from the goods or services purchased by consumers, which are frequently labeled "consumer goods". All three of these are required in combination at a time to produce a commodity.
Factory Orders
The monthly Full Report on Manufacturers' Shipments, Inventories, & Orders from the Census Bureau, more commonly called the Factory Orders report, totals the dollar volume of new orders, shipments, unfilled orders, and inventories reported by domestic manufacturers. Figures within the Factory Orders report are reported in the billions of dollars and also in a percent change from the previous month. Generally the Factory Orders report is not as widely watched as other economic releases. The Advance Release on Durable Goods, which usually precedes the Factory Orders report by one week, garners more attention, given that the durable goods report includes orders for capital goods, a proxy for equipment investmest.
Fade
Fail
Failure is the state or condition of not meeting a desirable or intended objective, and may be viewed as the opposite of. Product failure ranges from failure to sell the product to fracture of the product, in the worst cases leading to personal injury, the province of forensic engineering.
Failed Break
Failure To Deliver
In finance, a failure to deliver is the inability of a party to deliver a tradable asset, or meet a contractual obligation. A typical example is the failure to deliver shares as part of a short transaction. The Securities and Exchange Commission publishes "fails-to-deliver" data regarding transactions in the United States.
Fair And Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA)
Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA)
Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA)
The Fair Credit Reporting Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1681 is U.S. Federal Government legislation enacted to promote the accuracy, fairness, and privacy of consumer information contained in the files of consumer reporting agencies. It was intended to protect consumers from the willful and/or negligent inclusion of inaccurate information in their credit reports. To that end, the FCRA regulates the collection, dissemination, and use of consumer information, including consumer credit information. Together with the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, the FCRA forms the foundation of consumer rights law in the United States. It was originally passed in 1970, and is enforced by the US Federal Trade Commission, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and private litigants.
Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA)
Fair Funds for Investors
Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)
Fair Market Value Purchase Option
Fair Market Value
Fair market value is an estimate of the market value of a property, based on what a knowledgeable, willing, and unpressured buyer would probably pay to a knowledgeable, willing, and unpressured seller in the market. An estimate of fair market value may be founded either on precedent or extrapolation. Fair market value differs from the intrinsic value that an individual may place on the same asset based on their own preferences and circumstances.
Fair Trade Investing
Fair Trade Price
Fair Value
In accounting and in most Schools of economic thought, fair value is a rational and unbiased estimate of the potential market price of a good, service, or asset. It takes into account such objective factors as...
Fair Weather Fund
Fairness Opinion
A fairness opinion is a professional evaluation by an investment bank or other third party as to whether the terms of a merger, acquisition, buyback, spin-off, or privatization are fair. It is rendered for a fee. They are typically issued when a public company is being sold, merged or divested of all or a substantial division of their business. They can also be required in private transactions not involving a company that is traded on a public exchange, as well as in circumstances other than mergers, such as a corporation exchanging debt for equity. Some of the specific functions of a fairness opinion are to aid in decision-making, mitigate risk, and enhance communication.
Fairway Bond
Fake Claims
Fakeout
Fallen Angel
Falling Knife
Falling Three Methods
Fallout Risk
False Market
False Signal
Fama And French Three Factor Model
Family And Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
Family Income Rider
Family Limited Partnership (FLP)
Family Of Funds
Family Offices
The term family office can refer to a family controlled investment group, and also the two major terms: single family office or multi-family office. The distinction is important since, despite the similar names, they provides significantly different services. This article refers principally to single family offices, which are the predominant forms of family offices today.
Far Option
Farm Credit System (FCS)
Farm Income
In United States agricultural policy, several measures are used to gauge farm income over a given period of time.
Farm Price Index (FPI)
Farm Team
In sports, a farm team, farm system, feeder team, or nursery club, is generally a team or club whose role is to provide experience and training for young players, with an agreement that any successful players can move on to a higher level at a given point. This system can be implemented in many ways, both formally and informally.
Farmer Mac Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation (FAMC)
Farmers Home Administration (FmHA)
Farmout
Fast Market Rule
Fast Market
Fast Tape
Fat Cat
Fat Finger Error
A fat-finger error is a keyboard input error in the financial markets such as the stock market or foreign exchange market whereby an order to buy or sell is placed of far greater size than intended, for the wrong stock or contract, at the wrong price, or with any number of other input errors.
Fat Man Strategy
Fear And Greed Index
Feasibility Study
Featherbedding
Featherbedding is the practice of hiring more workers than are needed to perform a given job, or to adopt work procedures which appear pointless, complex and time-consuming merely to employ additional workers. The term "make-work" is sometimes used as a synonym for featherbedding.
Fed Balance Sheet
Fed Model
The "Fed model" is a theory of equity valuation that has found broad application in the investment community. The model compares the stock market's earnings yield to the yield on long-term government bonds. In its strongest form the Fed model states that bond and stock market are in equilibrium, and fairly valued, when the one-year forward-looking earnings yield equals the 10-year Treasury note yield ...
Fed Speak
Federal Advisory Council
The Federal advisory council or is a body composed of representatives chosen by each of the twelve Federal Reserve Banks that "consults with and advises the Board on all matters within the Board's jurisdiction."
Federal Agencies
Federal Call
Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
The Federal Communications Commission is an independent agency of the United States government created by statute to regulate interstate communications by radio, television, wire, satellite, and cable. The FCC works towards six goals in the areas of broadband, competition, the spectrum, the media, public safety and homeland security, and modernizing itself.
Federal Covered Advisor
Federal Credit Union (FCU)
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC)
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act (FDICIA)
Federal Direct Student Loan Program (FDSLP)
Federal Discount Rate
Federal Employee Retirement System (FERS)
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)
Federal Farm Credit System (FFCS)
Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC)
Federal Funds Rate
In the United States, the federal funds rate is the interest rate at which depository institutions lend reserve balances to other depository institutions overnight, on an uncollateralized basis. Reserve balances are amounts held at the Federal Reserve to maintain depository institutions' reserve requirements. Institutions with surplus balances in their accounts lend those balances to institutions in need of larger balances. The federal funds rate is an important benchmark in financial markets.
Federal Funds
In the United States, federal funds are overnight borrowings between banks and other entities to maintain their bank reserves at the Federal Reserve. Banks keep reserves at Federal Reserve Banks to meet their reserve requirements and to clear financial transactions. Transactions in the federal funds market enable depository institutions with reserve balances in excess of reserve requirements to lend reserves to institutions with reserve deficiencies. These loans are usually made for one day only, that is, "overnight". The interest rate at which these deals are done is called the federal funds rate. Federal funds are not collateralized; like eurodollars, they are an unsecured interbank loan.
Federal Home Loan Bank Act
The Federal Home Loan Bank Act, is a United States federal law passed under President Herbert Hoover in order to lower the cost of home ownership. It established the Federal Home Loan Bank Board to charter and supervise federal savings and loan institutions. It also created the Federal Home Loan Banks which lend to building and loan associations, cooperative banks, homestead associations, insurance companies, savings banks, community development financial institutions, and insured depository institutions in order to finance home mortgages.
Federal Home Loan Bank System (FHLB)
Fiat Money
Fiat money is a currency established as money by government regulation or law. The term derives from the Latin ' used in the sense of an order or decree. It differs from commodity money and representative money. Commodity money is created from a good, often a precious metal such as gold or silver, which has uses other than as a medium of exchange, while representative money simply represents a claim on such a good.
Fibonacci Retracement
In finance, Fibonacci retracement is a method of technical analysis for determining support and resistance levels. They are named after their use of the Fibonacci sequence. Fibonacci retracement is based on the idea that markets will retrace a predictable portion of a move, after which they will continue to move in the original direction.
Financial Security
Fixed Assets
Fixed assets, also known as tangible assets or property, plant, and equipment, is a term used in accounting for assets and property that cannot easily be converted into cash. This can be compared with current assets such as cash or bank accounts, which are described as liquid assets. In most cases, only tangible assets are referred to as fixed.
Foreclosure
Foreclosure is a legal process in which a lender attempts to recover the balance of a loan from a borrower who has stopped making payments to the lender by forcing the sale of the asset used as the collateral for the loan.
Forex
The foreign exchange market is a global decentralized market for the trading of currencies. This includes all aspects of buying, selling and exchanging currencies at current or determined prices. In terms of volume of trading, it is by far the largest market in the world. The main participants in this market are the larger international banks. Financial centres around the world function as anchors of trading between a wide range of multiple types of buyers and sellers around the clock, with the exception of weekends. The foreign exchange market does not determine the relative values of different currencies, but sets the current market price of the value of one currency as demanded against another.
Four Percent Rule
Free Cash Flow
In corporate finance, free cash flow or free cash flow to firm is a way of looking at a business's cash flow to see what is available for distribution among all the securities holders of a corporate entity. This may be useful to parties such as equity holders, debt holders, preferred stock holders, and convertible security holders when they want to see how much cash can be extracted from a company without causing issues to its operations.
Fundamental Analysis
Fundamental analysis, in finance, is the analysis of a business's financial statements; health; and its competitors and markets. When applied to futures and forex, it focuses on the overall state of the economy, and considers factors including interest rates, production, earnings, employment, GDP, housing, manufacturing and management. When analyzing a stock, futures contract, or currency using fundamental analysis there are two basic approaches one can use: bottom up analysis and top down analysis. The terms are used to distinguish such analysis from other types of investment analysis, such as quantitative and technical.
Futures