Terms

  1. PEG Ratio (Under Review)
  2. PL Statement (Under Review)
  3. PPP (Under Review)
  4. Passive Investing
    Passive management is an investing strategy that tracks a market-weighted index or portfolio. The idea is to minimize investing fees and to avoid the adverse consequences of failing to correctly anticipate the future. The most popular method is to mimic the performance of an externally specified index. investors typically do this by buying one or more index funds. By tracking an index, an investment portfolio typically gets good diversification, low turnover, and low management fees. With low fees, an investor in such a fund would have higher returns than a similar fund with similar investments but higher management fees and/or turnover/transaction costs.
  5. Payday Loan
    A payday loan is a small, short-term unsecured loan, "regardless of whether repayment of loans is linked to a borrower's payday." The loans are also sometimes referred to as "cash advances," though that term can also refer to cash provided against a prearranged line of credit such as a credit card. Payday advance loans rely on the consumer having previous payroll and employment records. Legislation regarding payday loans varies widely between different countries and, within the USA, between different states.
  6. Penny Stock
    Penny stocks, also known as cent stocks in some countries, are common shares of small public companies that trade at low prices per share. In the United States, the SEC defines a penny stock as a security that trades below $5 per share, is not listed on a national exchange, and fails to meet other specific criteria. In the United Kingdom, stocks priced under £1 are called penny shares. In the case of many penny stocks, low market price inevitably leads to low market capitalization. Such stocks can be highly volatile and subject to manipulation by stock promoters and pump and dump schemes. Such stocks present a high risk for investors, who are often lured by the hope of large and quick profits. Penny stocks in the USA are often traded over-the-counter on the OTC Bulletin Board, or Pink Sheets. In the United States, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority have specific rules to define and regulate the sale of penny stocks.
  7. Pension Fund
    A pension fund, also known as a superannuation fund in some countries, is any plan, fund, or scheme which provides retirement income.
  8. Planned Obsolescence
    Planned Obsolescence is a book by Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Scholarly Communication at the Modern Language Association and Visiting Research Professor of English at New York University, published by NYU Press on November 1, 2011.
  9. Ponzi Scheme
    A Ponzi scheme is a fraudulent investment operation where the operator, an individual or organization, pays returns to its investors from new capital paid to the operators by new investors, rather than from profit earned by the operator. Operators of Ponzi schemes usually entice new investors by offering higher returns than other investments, in the form of short-term returns that are either abnormally high or unusually consistent.
  10. Portfolio
  11. Preferred Stock
    Preferred stock is a type of stock which may have any combination of features not possessed by common stock including properties of both an equity and a debt instrument, and is generally considered a hybrid instrument. Preferred stocks are senior to common stock, but subordinate to bonds in terms of claim and may have priority over common stock in the payment of dividends and upon liquidation. Terms of the preferred stock are described in the articles of association.
  12. Premium
  13. Price Earnings Ratio
    The price/earnings ratio is the ratio of a company's stock price to the company's earnings per share. The ratio is used in valuing companies.
  14. Price Earnings to Growth
  15. Price to Book Ratio
    The price-to-book ratio, or P/B ratio, is a financial ratio used to compare a company's current market price to its book value. It is also sometimes known as a Market-to-Book ratio. The calculation can be performed in two ways, but the result should be the same each way. In the first way, the company's market capitalization can be divided by the company's total book value from its balance sheet. The second way, using per-share values, is to divide the company's current share price by the book value per share.
  16. Private Equity
    In finance, private equity is an asset class consisting of equity securities and debt in operating companies that are not publicly traded on a stock exchange.
  17. Private Mortgage Insurance
    Lenders mortgage insurance, also known as private mortgage insurance in the US, is insurance payable to a lender or trustee for a pool of securities that may be required when taking out a mortgage loan. It is insurance to offset losses in the case where a mortgagor is not able to repay the loan and the lender is not able to recover its costs after foreclosure and sale of the mortgaged property. Typical rates are $55/mo. per $100,000 financed, or as high as $125/mo. for a typical $200,000 loan.
  18. Profit Margin
    Profit Margin, net margin, net profit margin or net profit ratio is a measure of profitability. It is calculated by finding the net profit as a percentage of the revenue.
  19. Profit and Loss Statement
    An income statement or profit and loss account is one of the financial statements of a company and shows the company's revenues and expenses during a particular period. It indicates how the revenues are transformed into the net income. It displays the revenues recognized for a specific period, and the cost and expenses charged against these revenues, including write-offs and taxes. The purpose of the income statement is to show managers and investors whether the company made or lost money during the period being reported.
  20. Put Option
    In finance, a put or put option is a stock market device which gives the owner of the put the right, but not the obligation, to sell an asset, at a specified price, by a predetermined date to a given party. The purchase of a put option is interpreted as a negative sentiment about the future value of the underlying. Put options are most commonly used in the stock market to protect against the decline of the price of a stock below a specified price. If the price of the stock declines below the specified price of the put option, the owner/buyer of the put has the right, but not the obligation, to sell the asset at the specified price, while the seller of the put has the obligation to purchase the asset at the strike price if the owner uses the right to do so. In this way the buyer of the put will receive at least the strike price specified, even if the asset is currently worthless.
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