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Financial Terms beginning with V

V Shaped Recovery
V
VA Loan
A VA loan is a mortgage loan in the United States guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. The loan may be issued by qualified lenders.
VIX
Vacancy Rate
Vacation Home
Vagit Y. Alekperov
Validation Period
Valoren Number
The VALOR number is a code which uniquely identifies listed securities and financial instruments in Switzerland, and serves a similar purpose to CUSIP or WKN in the North American or German markets respectively. The VALOR number is incorporated in the Swiss ISIN number.
Valuable Papers Insurance
Valuation Analysis
Valuation Clause
Valuation Mortality Table
Valuation Period
Valuation Premium
Valuation Reserve
Valuation
Value Added Monthly Index (VAMI)
Value Added Network (VAN)
Value Added Reseller
Value Added Tax (VAT)
Value Added
Value At Risk (VaR)
Value Averaging
Value averaging, also known as dollar value averaging, is a technique of adding to an investment portfolio with the objective of providing a greater return than similar methods such as dollar cost averaging and random investment. It was developed by former Harvard University professor Michael E. Edleson. Value averaging is a formula-based investment technique where a mathematical formula is used to guide the investment of money into a portfolio over time. With the method, investors contribute to their portfolios in such a way that the portfolio balance increases by a set amount, regardless of market fluctuations. As a result, in periods of market declines, the investor contributes more, while in periods of market climbs, the investor contributes less. In contrast to dollar cost averaging which mandates that a fixed amount of money be invested at each period, the value averaging investor may actually be required to withdraw from the portfolio in some periods.
Value Based Pricing
Value Chain
A value chain is a set of activities that a firm operating in a specific industry performs in order to deliver a valuable product or service for the market. The concept comes through business management and was first described by Michael Porter in his 1985 best-seller, Competitive Advantage: Creating and Sustaining Superior Performance.
Value Change
Value Date
Value date, in finance, is the date when the value of an asset that fluctuates in price is determined. The value date is used when there is a possibility for discrepancies due to differences in the timing of asset valuation. It usually applies to forward currency contracts, options and other derivatives, interest payable or receivable.
Value Deflation
Value Engineering
Value engineering is a systematic method to improve the "value" of goods or products and services by using an examination of function. Value, as defined, is the ratio of function to cost. Value can therefore be increased by either improving the function or reducing the cost. It is a primary tenet of value engineering that basic functions be preserved and not be reduced as a consequence of pursuing value improvements.
Value Fund
Value Investing
Value investing is an investment paradigm that derives from the ideas on investment that Ben Graham and David Dodd began teaching at Columbia Business School in 1928 and subsequently developed in their 1934 text Security Analysis. Although value investing has taken many forms since its inception, it generally involves buying securities that appear underpriced by some form of fundamental analysis. As examples, such securities may be stock in public companies that trade at discounts to book value or tangible book value, have high dividend yields, have low price-to-earning multiples or have low price-to-book ratios.
Value Line Index
Value Network Analysis
Value network analysis is a methodology for understanding, using, visualizing, optimizing internal and external value networks and complex economic ecosystems. The methods include visualizing sets of relationships from a dynamic whole systems perspective. Robust network analysis approaches are used for understanding value conversion of financial and non-financial assets, such as intellectual capital, into other forms of value.
Value Network
A value network is a business analysis perspective that describes social and technical resources within and between businesses. The nodes in a value network represent people. The nodes are connected by interactions that represent tangible and intangible deliverables. These deliverables take the form of knowledge or other intangibles and/or financial value. Value networks exhibit interdependence. They account for the overall worth of products and services. Companies have both internal and external value networks.
Value Proposition
A value proposition is a promise of value to be delivered, communicated, and acknowledged. It is also a belief from the customer about how value will be delivered, experienced and acquired.
Value Reporting Form
Value Stock
Value investing is an investment paradigm which generally involves buying securities that appear underpriced by some form of fundamental analysis, though it has taken many forms since its inception. It derives from the ideas on investment that Ben Graham and David Dodd began teaching at Columbia Business School in 1928 and subsequently developed in their 1934 text Security Analysis. As examples, such securities may be stock in public companies that trade at discounts to book value or tangible book value, have high dividend yields, have low price-to-earning multiples or have low price-to-book ratios.
Value Trap
Value
Valued Marine Policy
Valued Policy Law (VPL)
Values
Vance D. Coffman
Vance D. Coffman was the Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Lockheed Martin Corporation. He was elected to the Board of Directors of 3M on 12 May 2009.
Vancouver Stock Exchange (VAN) .V
Vandalism And Malicious Mischief Insurance
Vandalism Endorsement
Vanguard Exchange Traded Funds
Vanilla Option
Vanilla Strategy
Vanishing Premium
Vanishing Premium Policy
VantageScore
VantageScore is a consumer credit-scoring model, created through a joint venture of the three major credit bureaus. The model is managed and maintained by an independent company, VantageScore Solutions, LLC, that was formed in 2006 and is jointly owned by the three bureaus.
Variability
Variable Annuity
A life annuity is an annuity, or series of payments at fixed intervals, paid while the purchaser is alive. A life annuity is an insurance product typically sold or issued by life insurance companies. Life annuities may be sold in exchange for the immediate payment of a lump sum or a series of regular payments, prior to the onset of the annuity.
Variable Benefit Plan
Variable Cost Plus Pricing
Variable Cost Ratio
Variable Cost
Variable costs are costs that change in proportion to the good or service that a business produces. Variable costs are also the sum of marginal costs over all units produced. They can also be considered normal costs. Fixed costs and variable costs make up the two components of total cost. Direct costs, however, are costs that can easily be associated with a particular cost object. However, not all variable costs are direct costs. For example, variable manufacturing overhead costs are variable costs that are indirect costs, not direct costs. Variable costs are sometimes called unit-level costs as they vary with the number of units produced.
Variable Coupon Renewable Note (VCR)
Variable Death Benefit
Variable Interest Entity (VIE)
Variable Interest Rate
Variable Life Insurance Policy
Variable Overhead Efficiency Variance
Variable Overhead Spending Variance
Variable Overhead
Variable Prepaid Forward Contracts
Variable Price Limit
Variable Rate Certificate Of Deposit
Variable Rate Demand Bond
Variable Rate Demand Note (VRDN)
Variable Rate Mortgage
A variable-rate mortgage, adjustable-rate mortgage, or tracker mortgage is a mortgage loan with the interest rate on the note periodically adjusted based on an index which reflects the cost to the lender of borrowing on the credit markets. The loan may be offered at the lender's standard variable rate/base rate. There may be a direct and legally defined link to the underlying index, but where the lender offers no specific link to the underlying market or index the rate can be changed at the lender's discretion. The term "variable-rate mortgage" is most common outside the United States, whilst in the United States, "adjustable-rate mortgage" is most common, and implies a mortgage regulated by the Federal government, with caps on charges. In many countries, adjustable rate mortgages are the norm, and in such places, may simply be referred to as mortgages.
Variable Ratio Write
Variable Survivorship Life Insurance
Variable Universal Life Insurance (VUL)
Variance Inflation Factor
In statistics, the variance inflation factor quantifies the severity of multicollinearity in an ordinary least squares regression analysis. It provides an index that measures how much the variance of an estimated regression coefficient is increased because of collinearity.
Variance Swap
A variance swap is an over-the-counter financial derivative that allows one to speculate on or hedge risks associated with the magnitude of movement, i.e. volatility, of some underlying product, like an exchange rate, interest rate, or stock index.
Variance
Variation Margin
Vasicek Interest Rate Model
Vault Receipt
Veblen Good
In economics, Veblen goods are types of material commodities for which the demand is proportional to its high price, which is an apparent contradiction of the law of demand; Veblen goods also are commodities that function as positional goods. Veblen goods are types of luxury goods, such as expensive wines, jewelry, fashion-designer handbags, and luxury cars, which are in demand because of the high prices asked for them. The high price makes the goods desirable as status symbols, by way of conspicuous consumption and conspicuous leisure; conversely, a decrease of the prices of Veblen goods would decrease demand for the products.
Vega Neutral
Vega
Velocity Of Money
"The term "velocity of money is incremented by Inflation more 0,5 Year in library Mario Henry Simonsen Inflation and Operations, FGV Brazil'" refers to how fast money passes from one holder to the next. It can refer to the income velocity of money, which is the frequency at which the average same unit of currency is used to purchase newly domestically-produced goods and services within a given time period. In other words, it is the number of times one unit of money is spent to buy goods and services per unit of time. Alternatively and less frequently, it can refer to the transactions velocity of money, which is the frequency with which the average unit of currency is used in any kind of transaction in which it changes possession—not only the purchase of newly produced goods, but also the purchase of financial assets and other items."
Ven
Vendor Financing
Vendor finance is a form of lending in which a company lends money to be used by the borrower to buy the vendor's products or property. Vendor finance is usually in the form of deferred loans from, or shares subscribed by, the vendor. The vendor often takes shares in the borrowing company. This category of finance is generally used where the vendor's expectation of the value of the business is higher than that of the borrower's bankers, and usually at a higher interest rate than would be offered elsewhere.
Vendor Note
Vendor Take Back Mortgage
Vendor
In a supply chain, a vendor, or a seller, is an enterprise that contributes goods or services. Generally, a supply chain vendor manufactures inventory/stock items and sells them to the next link in the chain. Today, the terms refers to a supplier of any good or service.
Venn Diagram
A Venn diagram is a diagram that shows all possible logical relations between a finite collection of different sets. These diagrams depict elements as points in the plane, and sets as regions inside closed curves. A Venn diagram consists of multiple overlapping closed curves, usually circles, each representing a set. The points inside a curve labelled S represent elements of the set S, while points outside the boundary represent elements not in the set S. Thus, for example, the set of all elements that are members of both sets S and T, S ∩ T, is represented visually by the area of overlap of the regions S and T. In Venn diagrams the curves are overlapped in every possible way, showing all possible relations between the sets. They are thus a special case of Euler diagrams, which do not necessarily show all relations. Venn diagrams were conceived around 1880 by John Venn.
Venture Capital Funds
Venture capital is a type of private equity, a form of financing that is provided by firms or funds to small, early-stage, emerging firms that are deemed to have high growth potential, or which have demonstrated high growth. Venture capital firms or funds invest in these early-stage companies in exchange for equity, or an ownership stake, in the companies they invest in. Venture capitalists take on the risk of financing risky start-ups in the hopes that some of the firms they support will become successful. The start-ups are usually based on an innovative technology or business model and they are usually from the high technology industries, such as information technology, social media or biotechnology.
Venture Capital Trust (VCT)
Venture Capital
Venture capital is a type of private equity, a form of financing that is provided to small, early-stage, emerging firms that are deemed to have high growth potential, or which have demonstrated high growth. Venture capital funds invest in these early-stage companies in exchange for equity–an ownership stake–in the companies they invest in. The start-ups are usually based on an innovative technology or business model and they are usually from the high technology industries, such as Information technology, social media or biotechnology. The typical venture capital investment occurs after an initial "seed funding" round. The first round of institutional venture capital to fund growth is called the Series A round. Venture capitalists provide this financing in the interest of generating a return through an eventual "exit" event, such as the company selling shares to the public for the first time in an Initial public offering or doing a merger and acquisition of the company.
Volatility