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Labor Intensive

Definition

Labor intensity is the relative proportion of labor used in a process. Its inverse is capital intensity.

Source: Investopedia
This Article has been Edited for Accessibility

Labor Intensive

What is 'Labor Intensive'

Labor intensive refers to a process or industry that requires a large amount of labor to produce its goods or services. The degree of labor intensity is typically measured in proportion to the amount of capital required to produce the goods or services; the higher the proportion of labor costs required, the more labor intensive the business.

Explaining 'Labor Intensive'

Labor-intensive industries include restaurants, hotels, agriculture and mining. Advances in technology and worker productivity have moved some industries away from labor-intensive status, but many still remain.

Labor-Intensive Industries

A prime example of a labor-intensive industry relates to agriculture, especially those companies involved in the cultivating of food items that must be picked with minimal damage to the plant as a whole, such as fruit from fruit trees. The construction industry is considered labor intensive as most of the required work is hands-on. Even with the use of certain tools, a person must be involved with the vast majority of the work. Many positions considered part of the service industry are considered labor intensive. This includes positions within the hospitality industry and the personal care industry.

Labor Costs

Labor costs encompass all of the necessary funds used to secure the human capital necessary to complete the work. This can include funds directed toward base wages along with any benefits that may be supplied. Labor costs are highly flexible, allowing the business to adjust based on current demands and overall affordability.

Capital Costs

Capital costs most often relate to the equipment necessary to meet production needs. This can include machinery in a manufacturing environment, vehicles for transporting goods or other materials, and the facilities in which the work is done. Capital costs are often fixed in nature, limiting the amount that can be changed on a day-to-day basis.


Additional Resources

  1. International Economics Glossary: L [www-personal.umich.edu]
  2. Capital-intensive Projects Induce More Effort Than ... [economics.uci.edu]
  3. The Paradox Of Worker Shortages At A Time Of High National ... [brookings.edu]
  4. Labor-intensive Development-- Theory And ... [ageconsearch.umn.edu]
  5. Impact Of Trade On Productivity Of Skilled And Unskilled Intensive ... [business.unr.edu]