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Labor Productivity

Definition

Workforce productivity is the amount of goods and services that a worker produces in a given amount of time. It is one of several types of productivity that economists measure. Workforce productivity, often referred to as labor productivity, is a measure for an organization or company, a process, an industry, or a country. Workforce productivity is to be distinguished from employee productivity which is a measure employed at individual level based on the assumption that the overall productivity can be broken down to increasingly smaller units until, ultimately, to the individual employee, in order be used for example for the purpose of allocating a benefit or sanction based on individual performance. The OECD defines it as "the ratio of a volume measure of output to a volume measure of input". Volume measures of output are normally gross domestic product or gross value added, expressed at constant prices i.e. adjusted for inflation.

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Last Sourced: 2017-08-01
This Article has been Edited for Accessibility

Workforce productivity

Workforce productivity is the amount of goods and services that a worker produces in a given amount of time. It is one of several types of productivity that economists measure. Workforce productivity, often referred to as labor productivity, is a measure for an organization or company, a process, an industry, or a country.

Workforce productivity is to be distinguished from employee productivity which is a measure employed at individual level based on the assumption that the overall productivity can be broken down to increasingly smaller units until, ultimately, to the individual employee, in order be used for example for the purpose of allocating a benefit or sanction based on individual performance (see also: Vitality curve).

The OECD defines it as "the ratio of a volume measure of output to a volume measure of input". Volume measures of output are normally gross domestic product (GDP) or gross value added (GVA), expressed at constant prices i.e. adjusted for inflation. The three most commonly used measures of input are:


Additional Resources

  1. Comparing 50 Years Of Labor Productivity In U.s. And Foreign ... [www2.econ.iastate.edu]
  2. Productivity And Growth [pages.stern.nyu.edu]
  3. Why Is Labor Productivity So Low? Consider Investments In Skills ... [brookings.edu]
  4. Understanding The Historic Divergence Between Productivity And A ... []